Download and launch an Elluminate session from the command line

by Patrick Connelly posted on January 07, 2013

We use Elluminate Live! for some of our meetings, and it has always bothered me that I have to launch the browser to use Elluminate especially for reoccurring meetings. So one afternoon I set out to fix this problem. I wrote the following script and have been using it for about a month now without any issues. You can set the parameters at the head of the script if you have a reoccurring meeting you want to use, or set the parameters at run time (or in an alias for multiple reoccurring meetings) if you need too.


Auto watch a directory and rebuild the repository when an rpm is added/updated

by Patrick Connelly posted on December 19, 2012

Today I started setting up the repository for people to use to install the Solenopsis rpm. The problem is I want to be able to build the rpm (via Jenkins) and push it to a remote server and automatically have the repo rebuild when it sees an rpm updated or added to the directory.

To do this, I wrote a small python script that can be run and backgrounded. It sends a pushover notification and runs createrepo against the target directory.


Nulling fields in Salesforce with SoapUI

by Patrick Connelly posted on August 26, 2012

The Problem

The other day I came across a problem where sending in a blank field to Salesforce via SOAP was not nulling out the field. Instead, the enterprise WSDL was treating this as if nothing was sent, and therefore not updating the field at all. This make sense. If you were to send a sparse data structure over with only fields you want to update, you wouldn’t want to either have to provide the current value of every field or have them all nulled out. So, how do you null out a field with SOAP via the enterprise (or partner) WSDL in Salesforce?


Dynamic dependent picklists in Salesforce

by Patrick Connelly posted on July 09, 2012

One thing that comes up a lot in the in the #salesforce IRC channel is doing dynamic Visual Force driven off of picklists. So, let’s buckle up and get to it.

Data Model

In this simple example we are going to make an extension to the case page. On this page we are going to us a custom Product/Version object to display on the page. The product list well be determined on the start/end date of the product. And the version will be driven by the currently selected product. Product

  • Name – The name of the product
  • Currently_Supported__c – Formula based on StartDate__c and EndDate__c (Integer version of a boolean)
  • StartDate__c – The date the product should be shown (Rollup min from the version)
  • EndDate__c – The date the product should be hidden (Rollup max from the version)

Version

  • Name – The name of the version
  • Currently_Supported__c – Formula based on StartDate__c and EndDate__c (Integer version of a boolean)
  • StartDate__c – The date the version should be shown
  • EndDate__c – The date the version should be hidden
  • Product__c – The product the version is related to

Swapping two files with a quick bash function

by Patrick Connelly posted on July 03, 2012

One thing I find myself doing a lot is swapping two files in bash. I thought about making this into a bash script then I realized 1) that’s over kill and 2) not as portable as I want. So, if you add this to your .bashrc then re-source it, you’ll be able to run the command swap to switch two files

function swap() {
  TMP_NAME="TMP_$RANDOM"
  mv "$1" "/tmp/$TMP_NAME" && mv "$2" "$1" && mv "/tmp/$TMP_NAME" "$2"
}

Scheduled actions in Salesforce with Apex

by Patrick Connelly posted on May 26, 2012

Scheduled actions in Apex are great to use when you need to have a section of code run at a particular time in the future and Time-Based workflows will not work. In the example below I’ll talk about how to schedule code to run at the first of every month, in addition talk about some constructs you can use to make your life easier when you have to redeploy/change this code


Salesforce and soapUI – Using the default query method

by Patrick Connelly posted on April 13, 2012

In a previous post I discussed how to test Salesforce webservices with soapUI. In this post I will show how to use the “default” methods inside the enterprise WSDL.

Logging In

First we need to login to Salesforce and get our session Id. Under the SoapBinding list, expand login and choose Show Request Editor. After opening the request editor we need to remove the extra headers we don’t need, and fill in our username and password.


Reducing Salesforce SOQL queries by using static variables

by Patrick Connelly posted on April 04, 2012

The more moving pieces you have with triggers and classes the more you want to reduce the number of SOQL queries. One way to do this is to have Utility classes that do a lot of the heavy lifting. The problem with this is that you don’t want to call a utility method that does a query every time, because if you call it from different triggers you’ll end up with multiple calls. This is where overloading static variables can come in.

The Problem

Lets say you have a trigger on a Contact that needs information from our mostly static MyObject__c and then the Contact trigger then updates a Case. The Case trigger also need information from the MyObject__c. Normally this would require two SOQL queries even if it was in a utility class. We can use some of the built-in functionality in Apex to overload a static variable.


Classifying Triggers in Salesforce

by Patrick Connelly posted on February 13, 2012

Anyone that has ever had multiple triggers on objects in Salesforce knows that it can be very painful to manage them. Because of the way Salesforce chooses to run the triggers your code can be run in a non-deterministic order. In addition to this, having to sort through multiple files to find the one piece of code you are looking to update can be painful.

To combat this, you can take your triggers and condense them down into a single trigger and a single class. Inside this class you would have a method containing each of your individual triggers.


Vim and Salesforce development

by Patrick Connelly posted on February 09, 2012

Since I switched over to using vim as my primary mode of Salesforce development, I’ve been asked several times how I’ve configured vim. Well, it’s about time I show the man behind the curtain. My primary vim config file is quite large now, but I’ve condensed it down to the parts that I think are most pertinent to Salesforce development.