2016 Tuna 200 Race Report

by Patrick Connelly posted on October 25, 2016

This will be the first time I’ve written a post like this, so if it’s terrible, I’m sorry. This post will be not related to Salesforce work at all so don’t feel obligated to read it if you’re expecting Salesforce stuff.

2016 marks the 3rd year that I’ve participated in the Tuna 200 and the 5th time I’ve done a endurance relay race. I thought I’d take a moment to record how this year’s race went, what worked well and what I would change for next year


Child Package: Extending a Manage Package

by Patrick Connelly posted on October 18, 2016

In an effort to try to reduce the amount of code in our base repository we’ve been looking at writing managed packages that we install in our production org and then delegate the development and maintenance of these packages off to other teams. Being a Open Source company we also want to try to offer what work we’ve done to other people. However, not everything we want this package to do is useful outside of our business. To solve this, we’re releasing the base package and then creating a private child package to hold most of our business logic and custom fields.


Dreamforce recap

by Patrick Connelly posted on October 13, 2016

So it’s been a week since the end of Dreamforce 2016 and I’ve had some time to soak in what was talked about. This year my task for Dreamforce was to go and get some pretty specific answers. So, instead of talking about everything that happened at Dreamforce and what I think about it, I’m going to talk about the three things I was tasked with looking into.


Live Agent Quickstart

by Patrick Connelly posted on October 03, 2016

With the recent updates to the licensing model at Salesforce, lots of companies now get Live Agent licenses included. Because of this I’m working on a hands-on training for how to setup Live Agent and use it in Service Console. As you could guess, this isn’t an quick thing to do so I’m splitting it up into parts.

Quickstart

Why?

One of the hardest parts of Live Agent to test out for non-developers is the actual web front end part. If write the HTML locally and then you can test it but others can’t. To make it so others can test it, you either have to set up a web server or figure out how to deploy it to a cloud provider such as Heroku or Openshift. And that can be pretty daunting for someone that’s just trying to setup a proof of concept or is just working on the configuration side and will pass it off to someone else from their web team.


Dreamforce: What Not To Bring

by Patrick Connelly posted on September 26, 2016

By this point, you’ve no doubt read plenty of articles about what to bring to Dreamforce and how to prepare. If you’ve not had the chance yet, do yourself a favor and checkout the Dreamforce Trailhead module. But that’s not what I’m here to talk about. I want to talk about things you shouldn’t bring to Dreamforce, specifically things that I have brought in the past. So, let’s learn from my mistakes!

Dreamforce Ready

If this upcoming Dreamforce is your first, buckle up! it’s a wild ride. 2016 will be my 5th Dreamforce and I’ve brought a bunch of things over the years thinking I would need them and ended up not using them at all (or barely).


My Story: How I Became A Salesforce Developer

by Patrick Connelly posted on September 20, 2016

There are many stories like this, but this one is mine. I was born in North Carolina… wait, that’s probably too far back.

Becoming a Code Monkey

Since an early age, I’ve known that I’ve wanted to be a programmer. I use to “design” web pages on Angelfire and dabble in BASIC back in middle school. Looking back now, it wasn’t anything special but it was the catalyst that would carry me into some of my high school classes and eventually on to my degree in computer science from North Carolina State University (go Wolfpack!).


Namespaced Component in Managed Packages

by Patrick Connelly posted on September 13, 2016

As part of my managed package crusade I decided I should delve into the world of Visualforce from a managed package. While pure Visualforce is going to be in my package that’s not nearly as interesting as packaging and using namespaced components as part of the package. So let’s take a look at how we can use a namespaced component.

Namespaced Component

The component that I created in my packaging org is simple. The Visualforce page provides an account Id and the component lists out each of the account’s cases. This component isn’t going to win any awards for originality, but it will serve it’s purpose.


Namespaced REST in Managed Packages

by Patrick Connelly posted on September 07, 2016

Recently I’ve been working more with managed packages and I knew that I’d be writing REST interfaces inside that package. However I had no clue how namespaced REST interfaces would be presented or how you accessed them. I was afraid that there could be conflicts. For example if the package exposed /lastcase and the customer’s org had /lastcase how would they play together. I’m very happy to announce that the folks at Salesfore are on the ball and the platform handles it wonderfully.


Travel Gear

by Patrick Connelly posted on September 01, 2016

This weeks post is going to be another off topic one. I’ve been traveling more recently and I wanted to share the gear I use and what I like (and don’t like about) them.

Base Travel Gear

Regardless of the type of trip I’m taking, these items always come with me

Suitcase

I struggled for a long time to find the right suitcase. When looking for it my criteria was that I wanted a rolling suitcase that would fit in the overhead. This is a really wide category and there are hundreds that fit into this category. So I started looking at companies that I’ve use their gear before and the Osprey Merdian 22 caught my eye. It’s got some great features such as a disconnect-able backpack and straps that convert it to a backpack from a roller bag.


Quick Deploy with Solenopsis

by Patrick Connelly posted on August 22, 2016

In Spring ‘15 Salesforce released a feature called “Quick Deploy” that allows you to only run a small subset of tests when you do your deployment instead of running all the tests. When you’re in an org like ours that running all tests can take upwards of 5hrs (or longer if the moon is aligned incorrectly) this is wonderful. Let’s take a look at how quick deploy works and how you can use quick deploy with Solenopsis.

How Quick Deploy Works

Quick deploy simply runs a provided list of tests when you run your deployment. This deployment is then staged under your Deployment Status in setup. Once the all the tests have run you’ll get a button that let’s you quick deploy.